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Faces and Places

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img/catalogue/NB3-s.jpgForging a scythe blade
in Nepal
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All human beings ...


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L. N. Tolstoy in his cabin
by I. Repin, 1891



"Great initiative that we will gladly support! The scythe is the best thing that happened to us in the last 10 years! How could mankind move away from such silent slick efficiency?"

Yasmine and Doug
Lynx Track Farm
Yukon, Canada



Colleen Bryant from Murrumbateman, Australia writes:

"Hello Alexander,

... the blades and sickle arrived and they are truly beautiful too use. Thank you!

I also wanted to say thank you for undertaking the sythe project in Nepal. My partner and I travelled throughout the Himalayas (India and Nepal) in 2004-05. When we were in Ladahk in Northern India it came to our attention that many families were struggling. Education has provided new opportunities to young people. Parents are keen to send their children into Leh, as they would like their children to have the opportunity for a better and easier life than they themselves have had. The outcome of parents dedication to having their children educated is that their are fewer people around to do the agricultural tasks necessary to survive. I know that you have considered the potential impacts of introducing a new technology to another culture. I just wanted to say, that the introduction of the scythe, is one way of providing more efficient agricultural techniques, to counterbalance the loss of labour that arises as a consequence of education, one of the unforseen outcomes of community projects.

Thank you for initiating such a project!

Kind regards,
Colleen."



"I enjoy my scythe from May until November, clearing an orchard at Cumberland historic Chinatown and No.1 Mine Japanese Town site. Thank you for bringing me such pleasure and sharing the joy of the scythe around the world..."

Grace Doherty
Cumberland, BC, Canada


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INTRODUCTION

During my travels in Northern India and Nepal, while watching local farmers and their children using sickles, it occurred to me that a scythe would enable them to accomplish the task much faster and with less exertion.
Upon return to Canada and subsequent research I eventually connected with Chris Evans of Himalayan Permaculture Centre -- and my vision began to take shape...

First, a brief note on existence in rural Nepal.

Life in the remote mountainous areas of Nepal is physically very demanding. It was so for generations, but it is becoming ever more difficult for these hard-working people -- whose primary source of livelihood is small scale agriculture -- to make ends meet. In recent years some of the young, have left the family farms to seek some less strenuous future in the cities, and thus the land-working hands became fewer.
Many families now live continuously on the edge of bare sustenance; inclement weather during harvest can easily tip that balance between having enough to eat, or not. With the intensifying effects of climate change, unpredictable weather patterns are becoming more frequent.
A means to speed up the harvest would be of decided benefit to these people.

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  • UPDATES FROM THE HPC REPORTS

  • WHY SPIN 2013 IS NOT HAPPENING

  • THE PROPOSAL FOR SPIN 2013

  • SICKLE, SCYTHE OR MOTORIZED HARVESTER

  • A VIDEO PRESENTATION FROM THE PROJECT IN NEPAL 2012

  • THE REPORT FROM THE FIELD, SPRING 2012

  • THE PROPOSAL FOR THE PILOT PROJECT 2012


    You can help!

    If you would like to support the scythe project in Nepal and other developing countries, your donation would be greatly appreciated.
    The full amount of all donations will be used for the scythe initiative. Cheques can be made payable to "Scythe Project in Nepal".




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    The village blacksmith with the first locally produced scythe blade.




    Here are a few photos from rural Nepal.

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